Signposts to God

14595561_10154641946118060_811756105734319421_n

“Suppose that the moral structure, the ethical voice, the heart-wrenching aesthetic, the endless yearning for a world made good, are not the fantasies of a deracinated ape, but rather are signposts to deep realities in which our destiny may be involved.” Simon Conway Morris, Professor of Paleobiology, Cambridge University.



Categories: God, Science

27 replies

  1. Suppose that morality may not be driven by a deity that applies differing standards (or is held to different standards by different people), but rather by our evolution as social animals, and built on instinctive premises.

    Like

    • timon,
      Sounds like Darwinism is your religion. Who imbued us with those “instinctive premises?”

      Like

    • In that case, immorality would be just as much of an evolved and deeply innate trait.

      How do you then suppose the justice system takes into account these evolved instincts of morality that vary from one person to the next?

      Liked by 1 person

    • Not necessarily VS. Our evolution has given us logic and reason, along with a deep-seated need to fit in and be part of a group. Behaviour which threatens the welfare of the group leads to the perpetrators being punished.

      Like

    • Hi Darthimon,

      Are you saying that this instinct which human possess is inherently “programmed” toward morality?

      Like

    • No. It’s shaped – and been shaped – by our evolution.

      Like

    • Ok, why do you think it is shaped- and been shaped- toward good not the other way around?

      Like

    • Because such behaviours are more likely to ensure the survival of the species.

      Like

    • But how does this instinct “know”which direction it must develop which will result in such behaviour which ensure the welfare of its host species?

      Liked by 1 person

    • “Darthtimon”

      “Behaviour which threatens the welfare of the group leads to the perpetrators being punished.”

      But your ethical judgement is focused mainly on individual rights, not on social welfare. For instance see our discussion on alcohol.

      Like

    • Yes, I believe in individual rights. I also believe in the welfare of the group. These are not mutually exclusive positions. The vast majority of people who drink do so responsibly. Those who abuse alcohol (or any substance for that matter) and carry out disruptive acts find themselves punished.

      Like

    • Alcohol consumption damages social welfare. Just read the statistics.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Commanding the death of children as God did in the Bible damages society in a horrific fashion, yet we are supposed to regard God as a beacon of morality.

      Like

    • “Our evolution has given us logic and reason…” darthtimon

      Dart, are you familiar with Anton Flew? He was considered one of the preeminent spokespersons for atheists during the 20th century. Late in life he said he realized that evolution was not possible in light of what science had discovered about the complexity of DNA.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Yet there are plenty of scientists – such as Brian Cox, to name but one – who would argue that evolution remains the best explanation for our existence.

      Like

    • Darthtimon

      “Commanding the death of children as God did in the Bible damages society in a horrific fashion, yet we are supposed to regard God as a beacon of morality.”

      Come on Dude, you are comparing hard statistical facts to an ancient book full of fairytales?

      If your statement was true

      “Our evolution has given us logic and reason, along with a deep-seated need to fit in and be part of a group. Behaviour which threatens the welfare of the group leads to the perpetrators being punished.”

      you should condemn alcohol consumption, but you don’t. So it’s not as easy “evolutionary plain simple” as you make it out to be, I would say.

      Liked by 1 person

    • And he will not tell us what HE believes for some reason

      Like

    • *Why* do you make the arbitrary distinction that morality is an evolved trait while immorality isn’t – when both would have been present for millions of years and both would have improved individual and collective survival?

      Why cite Brian Cox as some sort of authority who thinks Darwinian evolution is the best explanation of our existence? Isn’t his area of expertise physics, not life sciences or social sciences?

      Like

  2. is that what you actually believe?

    Like

    • I’ll tell you what I definitely don’t believe – I don’t believe anyone or anything can claim the moral high ground if they kill (or command the killing of) children.

      Like

  3. but I’m interested to know what you do believe.

    Like

  4. darthtimon, “I’ll tell you what I definitely don’t believe – I don’t believe anyone or anything can claim the moral high ground if they kill (or command the killing of) children.”

    Why?

    Like

  5. “Yet there are plenty of scientists – such as Brian Cox, to name but one – who would argue that evolution remains the best explanation for our existence.” darthtimon

    good point.

    Like

  6. “The vast majority of people who drink do so responsibly.” DARTHTIMON

    Did you know Dart, one in 7 who drinks alcohol ends up an alcoholic? I was amazed when I learned that. Russian roulette baby

    Liked by 1 person

    • Another evolutionary process Hank. Only the fittest survive. Preachers like you are doomed unfortunately.

      Like

    • Indeed, that is quite a statement to make. In certain areas of the world, you can’t drive (for good reason) after having one beer.

      What might be the percentage of people who ventured on the road at least once after drinking? A majority?

      Liked by 1 person

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: