Bible teaching

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Categories: Bible

22 replies

  1. One will never find a verse like Leviticus 21:18 in the Qur’an. Instead you will find contrasting verses such as these:

    “with every hardship there is relief,” (94:5)

    “no person shall have a burden laid on him greater than he can bear” (2:286).

    We also have the excellent and finest example of our Prophet Muhammad (sws) to follow in his exemplary treatment of, and behavior towards those with disabilities.

    He often appointed a blind man, Abdullah ibn Umm Maktum, as a leader in Madinah numerous times and always treated him with respect.

    He also helped an outcast and physically deformed man, Julaybib, to become accepted and beloved by the community and even helped him to live a normal life by finding him a beautiful wife from a prominent family.

    There was a man who the people called by an nick name “the lame one” and upon his acceptance of Islam Prophet Muhammad changed his name to the honorable Abd’ullah (servant of Allah).

    There are many other examples.

    The Prophet of Islam (sws) was always intent upon focusing on the inner beauty and amorphous souls of the his companions and of all the people who he met.

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  2. The context is qualification for priesthood.

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    • The context may be qualification for priesthood, but the root problem is that according to the Bible, God discriminates against any and all physically and mentally disabled people who may aspire to the priesthood.

      In contrast there is no similar such discrimination in Islam. Prophet Muhammad, elevated the social and spiritual status of people with disabilities. On a personal note, I have personally prayed behind a blind Imam….

      Here is the passage in question:

      “The Lord said to Moses, 17 “Say to Aaron: ‘For the generations to come none of your descendants who has a defect may come near to offer the food of his God. 18 No man who has any defect may come near: no man who is blind or lame, disfigured or deformed; 19 no man with a crippled foot or hand, 20 or who is a hunchback or a dwarf, or who has any eye defect, or who has festering or running sores or damaged testicles. 21 No descendant of Aaron the priest who has any defect is to come near to present the food offerings to the Lord. He has a defect; he must not come near to offer the food of his God. 22 He may eat the most holy food of his God, as well as the holy food; 23 yet because of his defect, he must not go near the curtain or approach the altar, and so desecrate my sanctuary. I am the Lord, who makes them holy.’” 24 So Moses told this to Aaron and his sons and to all the Israelites.”

      Now that’s harsh!

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  3. It has nothing to do with being harsh. Someone who manifests the curse of sin in such an extreme way cannot minister in the sanctuary, which is a holy place.

    The priests are mediators so they have to reflect the purity of Christ, who had no blemish.

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    • WOW! So according to Christianity, having a mental or physical disability is a manifestation of some mythological curse of sin?? Now THAT is Harsh! I wonder how disabled people feel about that?

      Also, just curious…….according to your Bible, was Christ pure and unblemished when he called a gentile woman a dog, and liken gentiles to swine? Or was he pure and unblemished when he was alleged to do the following by your Bible:

      1. Having a lack of knowledge, a fault for one supposedly divine (see Mark 13: 22-32, especially the last verse v. 32);

      2. Holding an erroneous belief (see Matthew 24:29-34);

      3. Claiming, or at least implying, that the scriptures (for his day, a large portion of our Old Testament) said
      something which is not found in the Old Testament (see Matthew 5:43);

      4. a. Misrepresenting the weight given to a teaching by the Old Testament as a whole, and b. presenting his teaching as new when it appeared in the Old Testament (for a., see Matthew 5:38, Isaiah 50:4-11, and
      Lamentations 3:24-30; for b., see Matthew 5:27-28, Exodus 20:17, Deuteronomy 5:21, Proverbs 6:25,
      and Ecclesiastes 9:5,8);

      5. Being a fanatic, or zealot, who encouraged fanaticism in others (see, Matthew 5:11-12, Luke 17:33, and
      Matthew 10:21-22);

      6. Being a name-caller, thus violating his own admonition to others (see Matthew 5:22 and Matthew
      23:13-33, KJV);

      7. Intolerance and bigotry (see Mark 16:16);

      8. Making a hurtful false promise (see Matthew 21:19-22); and

      9. Giving bad advice which, if generally followed by people, would result in needless suffering (see Matthew
      6:31-34).

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    • He did have a blemish according to the NT, he was pierced in the side by a lance.

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    • He was also blemished scourging, not to mention a crown of thorns, and nails. So much for the “unblemished” argument.

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  4. Punishment is harsh. That’s the intention. Either God is punishing us for original sin or he is inflicting misery solely for his self gratification. It must be the latter for you guys as Islam offers no explanation. How does Islam explain that picture? Give me the reason why that kid is as he is from an islamic perspective. You can’t.

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    • Erasmus,
      You and your religion offer a Hobbesian choice, between only two small minded options:
      1. Disabilities are either a harsh punishment for original sin.
      2. God is inflicting misery for self-gratification.

      Islamic teachings indicate that there is a third more rational and acceptable answer.

      Islam teaches that disabilities are a natural part of being a human; it’s NEITHER a blessing NOR a punishment.

      According to Islam we understand that people with disability “have strength and resources for their own empowerment” and these strengths are emphasized, but we acknowledge their disability; and thus Islam encourages Muslims to be emphatic and caring (but not overprotective) with others and assist them whenever they need help.

      Allah could have created us all equal and the same (Qur’an 5:48) but he chose to create us in diversity that we may come to know one another (Qur’an 49:13). A diverse creation allows us the opportunity to understand and even offer kindness, compassion, understanding, mercy, empathy and many other human emotions and experiences.

      Disabilities are viewed as a test in this life.

      Allah tests each of us in different ways in order to separate ways in order to evaluate our piety and obedience to his divine will.

      Allah tells us that through this journey we call life we will be tested. In Surat Al-Baqarah, He says:
      “And certainly, We shall test you with something of fear, hunger, loss of wealth, lives and fruits…” (Qur’an, 2:155)

      And he limits the test to what we can each handle, the greater the test, the greater the reward in heaven:
      “Allah does not burden a soul beyond that it can bear…” (Qur’an, 2:286).

      A question for you:
      If indeed disabilities are a harsh punishment from a vengeful Christian God for original sin, then why does he only punish some people for original sin, and not others? We can only conclude that the Christian God is unjust, harsh in punishment, vengeful and unreasonable in nature.

      I much prefer the merciful and understanding God, and more reasonable teachings of Islamic belief. I am sure that, if they only knew, disabled people would agree with Islam as well,

      Liked by 1 person

    • Another question:
      If indeed disabilities are a harsh punishment from a vengeful Christian God for original sin, then why doesn’t your God cure the disabled person when he accepts Jesus as his lord and savior who supposedly saved him from the curse of original sin?

      If the mythic curse of original sin has somehow magically been lifted, then why isn’t the disabled person miraculously cured of his disability?

      The undeniable fact that the disabled person isn’t healed of his disability, by the “atonement of the cross” clarifies three things:
      1. Jesus failed at the cross, (even the Pope agrees) since his sacrifice changed nothing.
      2. The doctrine of original sin is therefore a false doctrine.
      3. Disabilities are not a harsh punishment for original sin.

      As people of faith and religion we can all agree that your suggestion that inflicting misery solely for his self gratification, is beneath the dignity of God’s good will and grace.

      Therefore, only the option offered by Islam offers a rational, reasonable, and acceptable answer to the question, “why does God create people with disabilities?”

      Liked by 1 person

    • “You can’t”

      I can…….and I did.

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  5. Of course it could be drugs or some other man-made cause. I am not talking about that.

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    • Much of the tribulation afflicting man in this world has been caused, not by God, but by man himself. This is the inherent risk in free will and choice.

      “What comes to you of good is from Allah, but what comes to you of evil, [O man], is from yourself. And We have sent you, [O Muhammad], to the people as a messenger, and sufficient is Allah as Witness.” ~ (Qur’an 4:79)

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  6. “you shall not approach the lord with your defect”

    Your Point is…..?

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    • Read above.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Not being funny, but the article posts a picture of a child with birth defects accompanied by an OT quote – not seeing the point being made.

      Worse though, is that muslims are exploiting a picture of a child with birth defects to – seemingly – attack christian or jewish belief. I have two point about this: one, does the kid and his family know that you have taken his picture to exploit his misfortune to score theological points, and two, islam and muslims look really bad right now because of this.

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    • Brian,
      Given that the plurality of answers that the Bible offers on the problem of suffering are all, to one extent or another, clearly cruel, harsh, repugnant, simplistic, backward, and just plain dead wrong…..I think it is an intellectually and morally unsatisfying Christian theology that looks bad right now…..and I am sure that the disabled kid and his family would agree.

      I am also sure that the kid and his family would be happy to know that in Islam they will find a theology which is much more intellectually and morally acceptable and merciful towards those with disabilities.

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  7. “Islam teaches that disabilities are a natural part of being a human“

    There is nothing natural about disabilities. What is on show is Islam’s weak doctrine of sin again

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    • Not being funny, but the article posts a picture of a child with birth defects accompanied by an OT quote – not seeing the point being made.

      Worse though, is that muslims are exploiting a picture of a child with birth defects to – seemingly – attack christian or jewish belief. I have two point about this: one, does the kid and his family know that you have taken his picture to exploit his misfortune to score theological points, and two, islam and muslims look really bad right now because of this.

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    • That reply was meant for ibn issam above. Will post again.

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  8. The biblical view is that God would never inflict evil without sin. He does not inflict evil on something that is innocent. Fallen humanity is in a state of sin.

    Adam could not have been tested in the same way as Job before the Fall.

    The biblical God cannot mar his own image and he does not create defective human beings where there is no curse.

    To say that such things are natural is an indictment against your god and proof that he inflicts suffering arbitrarily and unneccessarily for his own self-gratification.

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    • You seem to take the classical view on the problem of suffering. It may surprise you to know that there are other Biblical views on the problem of suffering as well.

      The Biblical view on problem Dr. Bart Ehrman has identified 5 different answers that the Bible provides on the problem of suffering and concludes that none of the answers that the Bible provides is either morally or intellectually acceptable. This problem (along with additional problems he discovered through his study of the Bible) is what finally convinced him to leave Christianity.

      I suggest you read his book which addresses the problem of suffering from Biblical perspective:

      Unfortunately, Christian arguments on suffering and evil are usually based on some sort of fallacy or strawman, that do not allow one to consider any other options outside of the unsatisfactory options that the Bible offers.

      Alhamdullah, The intellectual richness of Islamic thought provides us with many reasons which address why God allows suffering to exist. The Qur’an offers valid, rational, logical reasons and answers which the Bible does not even consider.

      There are many other articles, books, and treatise on the subject of theodicy written by many great Islamic thinkers, and theologians. But for a good introduction into Islamic perspectives on the same subject read the following article:

      Is God Merciful? Islam’s Response to Evil & Suffering – Hamza Tzortsis
      http://www.hamzatzortzis.com/is-god-merciful-islams-response-to-evil-suffering/

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