Today ‘a bright light stepped into the darkness and changed this world forever’

Sir Isaac Newton born 25 December 1642

GodfreyKneller-IsaacNewton-1689

Although born into an Anglican family, by his thirties Newton held a Christian faith that, had it been made public, would not have been considered orthodox by mainstream Christianity.

By 1672 he had started to record his theological researches in notebooks which he showed to no one and which have only recently been examined. They demonstrate an extensive knowledge of early church writings and show that in the conflict between Athanasius and Arius which defined the Creed, he took the side of Arius, the loser, who rejected the conventional view of the Trinity. Newton “recognized Christ as a divine mediator between God and man, who was subordinate to the Father who created him.” He was especially interested in prophecy, but for him, “the great apostasy was trinitarianism.”

In Isaac Newton’s eyes, worshipping Christ as God was idolatry, to him the fundamental sin. Historian Stephen D. Snobelen says of Newton, “Isaac Newton never made a public declaration of his private faith—which the orthodox would have deemed extremely radical. He hid his faith so well that scholars are still unravelling his personal beliefs.” Snobelen concludes that Newton was at least a Socinian sympathiser (he owned and had thoroughly read at least eight Socinian books), possibly an Arian and almost certainly an anti-trinitarian.

In sum Newton, one of the greatest scientists who ever lived, applied his formidable intelligence to the Christian faith he inherited and quickly realised where it had gone so very wrong,

“the great apostasy was trinitarianism.”

“worshipping Christ as God was idolatry,

source

 

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Categories: Bible, Christianity, God, Science

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