Trinities 180 – Apologists on how God can die – Part 3

Published on Apr 24, 2017 by Dale Tuggy, Professor of Philosophy at the State University of New York, where he teaches courses in analytic theology, philosophy of religion, religious studies, and the history of philosophy.

http://trinities.org/blog/podcast-180… Dealing with this inconsistent triad is hard for many. After a few podcast recommendations, I work through a long post by Reformed blogger Steve Hays, trying to find the beef. Unfortunately, it’s nearly all bun. He’s not able to formulate a response to this inconsistent triad, the subject of our previous episodes in this series.

1. Jesus died.
2. Jesus was fully divine.
3. No fully divine being has ever died.

Then I evaluate the brief response of a YouTube apologist to this argument:

1. God cannot die. (premise)
2. Jesus Christ died. (premise)
3. Therefore, Jesus Christ cannot be God. (1,2)

Finally, I consider a response to my inconsistent triad by Catholic philosopher Dr. Daniel Vecchio. This is carefully considered, and brings in many distinctions made by the tradition. I think it brings out the difficulty of figuring out what “the” classical catholic answer is supposed to be. In particular, terms like “Christ,” “Jesus,” and “the Son” are ambiguous, referring either to (1) the man (if there is a man in one’s christology), (2) the human nature (which is not a man), (3) the Logos (aka the divine nature), or to (4) the whole Christ, the person who has two natures. It’s not clear that any but the first of these could in principle die a human death, i.e. lose a human life.

Links for this episode @ http://trinities.org/blog/podcast-180…

Weekly podcast exploring views about the Trinity, and more generally about God and Jesus in Christian theology and philosophy. Debates, interviews, and historical and contemporary perspectives. Hosted by philosopher of religion / analytic theologian Dr. Dale Tuggy.

Advertisements


Categories: Christianity, God, Philosophy

1 reply

  1. “(3) the Logos (aka the divine nature)…”

    The Logos is the second divine person, no?

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: